Vida Blue at the Fillmore leads to Blogger Hangover

Last night, I cracked open my new Netflix arrivals and popped Vida Blue with the Spam Allstars: Live at the Fillmore DVD. Somewhat relying on the Glide Magazine review of this DVD, I guess it was still worth while to check it out. I love the techno-synth that is Vida Blue, and the Spam Allstars add a whole new element to their sound that is really rock solid. The afro-cuban thing that the Spam Allstars bring to Vida Blue just might be a little too much for me. That’s not to say it isn’t funky, groovy, and mighty fine if you’re into that sort of thing. Choice cuts on the DVD for me were Most Events Aren’t Planned, CJ3, and a fun rendition of Cars Trucks Buses.

I think a lot of musicians are now struggling with the DVD release. How much extra things should be included? Should this rival a Lord of the Rings release? Even Phish, who pioneered and blazed their own trail up until the very end, don’t seem to spend the effort on a DVD that I would love to see. But, that’s just me I guess. I do need to remember that the typical fan doesn’t really buy DVD’s of a band they like listening to. I know SO many people that love music that would never find a good reason to buy a live DVD from one of their favorite bands (in the sort of been-there, nothing-new-to-see-here mentality.

The only thing that really distracted me on this DVD was their extraneous Vida Blue content. I just didn’t think that the person Vida Blue really has anything to do with Vida Blue the band. Other than the name. Therefore, I just didn’t find it relevant within the context of the DVD.