Cream Reviews

I’ll provide you faithful LMB readers with a first-hand review of last night’s Cream reunion show at Madison Square Garden some time later today. But first, since my journalistic undertaking will most likely be a little off the beaten path, here are some more serious reviews I found online this morning…

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Ben Ratliff of the New York Times
Dan Aquilante of the New York Post
Joan Anderman of the Boston Globe
Where’s Eric! portal

4 COMMENTS

  1. Hey Ace – Not being the hugest Cream fan of all time, I thought the show overall was good, although Jack was a little rusty. I was bummed a bit by the blowing “White Room,” but I thought most everything else was solid. Especially Ginger, who I had to make sure wasn’t going playback on us. He was that tight.

  2. Hey Ace – Not being the hugest Cream fan of all time, I thought the show overall was good, although Jack was a little rusty. I was bummed a bit by the blowing “White Room,” but I thought most everything else was solid. Especially Ginger, who I had to make sure wasn’t going playback on us. He was that tight.

  3. I saw Clapton and Cream last night. Overall it was somewhat understated — without the youthful ferocity and sonic attack from the old days — but still amazing to hear. They were always one of the great bands to see live (I saw them three times back in the day). Their legendary shows at the Fillmore West and Winterland in 1968 (heard on “Wheels of Fire”) heavily influenced the burgeoning San Francisco jam band genre, especially the Dead. You will probably never see a better British blues band with a better lead guitarist. Clapton is the prototype for almost all lead guitarists, and Cream are the template for all three-piece “supergroups” to follow (i.e. Mountain, Grand Funk, Government Mule etc.) Baker and Bruce have been playing more jazz in recent years, which brought a vibrant undercurrent to the songs. They had a very clean full sound, which did take off in some places — mostly during Clapton solos. His addition of the Wah-Wah pedal was a big plus which was sadly missed from the Royal Albert Hall gigs now on CD and DVD). Cream could be used in Public Service advertising: “Hire The Elderly – They Have the Necessary Chops and Experience.”

  4. I saw Clapton and Cream last night. Overall it was somewhat understated — without the youthful ferocity and sonic attack from the old days — but still amazing to hear. They were always one of the great bands to see live (I saw them three times back in the day). Their legendary shows at the Fillmore West and Winterland in 1968 (heard on “Wheels of Fire”) heavily influenced the burgeoning San Francisco jam band genre, especially the Dead. You will probably never see a better British blues band with a better lead guitarist. Clapton is the prototype for almost all lead guitarists, and Cream are the template for all three-piece “supergroups” to follow (i.e. Mountain, Grand Funk, Government Mule etc.) Baker and Bruce have been playing more jazz in recent years, which brought a vibrant undercurrent to the songs. They had a very clean full sound, which did take off in some places — mostly during Clapton solos. His addition of the Wah-Wah pedal was a big plus which was sadly missed from the Royal Albert Hall gigs now on CD and DVD). Cream could be used in Public Service advertising: “Hire The Elderly – They Have the Necessary Chops and Experience.”

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