Buyer Beware

While I’m confident that this is not actually Trey’s fault, I’m fully aware that he probably could have done something to prevent this.

Trey Anastasio’s new release, Shine, is featured prominently at the top of the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s listing of Sony-BMG DRM-protected CDs that are prepackaged with auto-installing CD-cloaking devices that won’t allow the CD to be ripped to mp3 (or a similar format for transfer to portable devices). In layman’s terms, Sony is completely making these CDs lame and nearly unusable on the buyer’s PC with the hope that people won’t find a way to transfer it to their own iPod. [via Boing Boing]

As the title suggests, buyer beware on this one. Might I suggest a friendly little download from Soulseek? I’ll look the other way if you do, too. (thanks Chris)

Update: From Chris again, please don’t buy Sony CDs. They can’t get away with this; the free market will prove them wrong.

18 COMMENTS

  1. This is the same thing that happened with Mike and Leo’s new cd I bought. The company sent me directions that allow you to make one copy of the cd, from which you can rip the songs onto your ipod. I haven’t bought Trey’s cd, but I’d imagine there is a way you can rip the songs, albiet a bit complicated.

  2. This is the same thing that happened with Mike and Leo’s new cd I bought. The company sent me directions that allow you to make one copy of the cd, from which you can rip the songs onto your ipod. I haven’t bought Trey’s cd, but I’d imagine there is a way you can rip the songs, albiet a bit complicated.

  3. This is the same thing that happened with Mike and Leo’s new cd I bought. The company sent me directions that allow you to make one copy of the cd, from which you can rip the songs onto your ipod. I haven’t bought Trey’s cd, but I’d imagine there is a way you can rip the songs, albiet a bit complicated.

  4. there is a really easy way around this.. either google it, or heres how in a nutshell.

    1. disable the autorun feature on your cd-rom, this is on a menu somewhere, search windows help. this can also be done manually by holding the shift key each time you insert a copy protected cd. this prevents the software from being loaded onto your machine, which is virtually impossible to remove once its there.

    2. once the disc is in the drive, but had not installed the software (because you disabled the autorun feature VERY IMPORTANT), use a ripping program to rip the tracks, EAC works great, and doesn’t acknowledge the copy-right protection. i backed up my mike and leo cd this way with no problem.

    Note: EAC will rip the disc if the software gets installed, but it sounds like the disc is skipping. whatever you do, do not agree to the end user license agreement that pops up when you insert the disc. this allows the software to be installed, after which you will be limited to one rip. once again, this can all be avoided by disabling the autorun feature of xp.
    good luck, and enjoy.

  5. there is a really easy way around this.. either google it, or heres how in a nutshell.

    1. disable the autorun feature on your cd-rom, this is on a menu somewhere, search windows help. this can also be done manually by holding the shift key each time you insert a copy protected cd. this prevents the software from being loaded onto your machine, which is virtually impossible to remove once its there.

    2. once the disc is in the drive, but had not installed the software (because you disabled the autorun feature VERY IMPORTANT), use a ripping program to rip the tracks, EAC works great, and doesn’t acknowledge the copy-right protection. i backed up my mike and leo cd this way with no problem.

    Note: EAC will rip the disc if the software gets installed, but it sounds like the disc is skipping. whatever you do, do not agree to the end user license agreement that pops up when you insert the disc. this allows the software to be installed, after which you will be limited to one rip. once again, this can all be avoided by disabling the autorun feature of xp.
    good luck, and enjoy.

  6. there is a really easy way around this.. either google it, or heres how in a nutshell.

    1. disable the autorun feature on your cd-rom, this is on a menu somewhere, search windows help. this can also be done manually by holding the shift key each time you insert a copy protected cd. this prevents the software from being loaded onto your machine, which is virtually impossible to remove once its there.

    2. once the disc is in the drive, but had not installed the software (because you disabled the autorun feature VERY IMPORTANT), use a ripping program to rip the tracks, EAC works great, and doesn’t acknowledge the copy-right protection. i backed up my mike and leo cd this way with no problem.

    Note: EAC will rip the disc if the software gets installed, but it sounds like the disc is skipping. whatever you do, do not agree to the end user license agreement that pops up when you insert the disc. this allows the software to be installed, after which you will be limited to one rip. once again, this can all be avoided by disabling the autorun feature of xp.
    good luck, and enjoy.

  7. From Slashdot.org:

    California has filed a class-action lawsuit against Sony and a second one may be filed today in New York. The lawsuit was filed Nov. 1 in Superior Court for the County of Los Angeles by Vernon, CA. It asks the court to prevent Sony from selling additional CDs protected by the anti-piracy software, and seeks monetary damages for California consumers who purchased them. The suit alleges that Sony’s software violates at least three California statutes, including the “Consumer Legal Remedies Act,” which governs unfair and/or deceptive trade acts; and the “Consumer Protection against Computer Spyware Act,” which prohibits — among other things — software that takes control over the user’s computer or misrepresents the user’s ability or right to uninstall the program. The suit also alleges that Sony’s actions violate the California Unfair Competition law, which allows public prosecutors and private citizens to file lawsuits to protect businesses and consumers from unfair business practices. EFF has released a list of rootkit affected CD’s and Slashdot user xtracto also has a list.

  8. From Slashdot.org:

    California has filed a class-action lawsuit against Sony and a second one may be filed today in New York. The lawsuit was filed Nov. 1 in Superior Court for the County of Los Angeles by Vernon, CA. It asks the court to prevent Sony from selling additional CDs protected by the anti-piracy software, and seeks monetary damages for California consumers who purchased them. The suit alleges that Sony’s software violates at least three California statutes, including the “Consumer Legal Remedies Act,” which governs unfair and/or deceptive trade acts; and the “Consumer Protection against Computer Spyware Act,” which prohibits — among other things — software that takes control over the user’s computer or misrepresents the user’s ability or right to uninstall the program. The suit also alleges that Sony’s actions violate the California Unfair Competition law, which allows public prosecutors and private citizens to file lawsuits to protect businesses and consumers from unfair business practices. EFF has released a list of rootkit affected CD’s and Slashdot user xtracto also has a list.

  9. From Slashdot.org:

    California has filed a class-action lawsuit against Sony and a second one may be filed today in New York. The lawsuit was filed Nov. 1 in Superior Court for the County of Los Angeles by Vernon, CA. It asks the court to prevent Sony from selling additional CDs protected by the anti-piracy software, and seeks monetary damages for California consumers who purchased them. The suit alleges that Sony’s software violates at least three California statutes, including the “Consumer Legal Remedies Act,” which governs unfair and/or deceptive trade acts; and the “Consumer Protection against Computer Spyware Act,” which prohibits — among other things — software that takes control over the user’s computer or misrepresents the user’s ability or right to uninstall the program. The suit also alleges that Sony’s actions violate the California Unfair Competition law, which allows public prosecutors and private citizens to file lawsuits to protect businesses and consumers from unfair business practices. EFF has released a list of rootkit affected CD’s and Slashdot user xtracto also has a list.

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