Live Nation to Compete with Ticketmaster

Man I’ve been busy the last couple days, and it appears that the live music space has been quite busy, too. My Morning Jacket announced a one-night stand at Radio City Music Hall for June 20 (presale this Friday at 10am), and the Coachella promoters announced a rival festival set to compete with the already announced Vineland Festival. Sexy and quite scandalous all around.

And I’m not sure if this would be much of a surprise to anyone following the live music industry itself, but Live Nation officially released an announcement detailing some plans to enter the ticketing business sometime next year (via HT).

Concert promoter Live Nation Inc will launch its own ticketing business in 2009 after it ends ties with Ticketmaster, the dominant box office service, and expects the venture will add to earnings in its first year.

Sure, it’ll add earnings…but will it really do anything for the consumers except introduce another bloated, slow-moving behemoth of a corporation to choose who to buy tickets from? My business textbooks tell me that competition is good for the consumer, but can we really trust that coming from a company snatching up competitors of their own? Discuss and have a good night, folks. We’ll be back for more tomorrow, including a new Drymount! column to satisfy the ravenous poster collectors in the room.

  • mark

    Check your history textbooks. Live Nation invented the lower price for consumers concept long ago. Their competitors claimed that they came up with the idea after Live Nation proved it’s loyalty to the consumer plan was a success. Why shouldn’t they sell their own tickets? The more they make, the more they can afford to continue to reduce prices and offer more value. They are known for sharing their wealth, so why waste it by paying someone to do a job for them that they can easily do themselves? What would you do? It’s good for everyone….except for that old dinosaur Ticketmaster. Out with the old already. L.N. is current and in touch with us…. the fans.

  • mark

    Check your history textbooks. Live Nation invented the lower price for consumers concept long ago. Their competitors claimed that they came up with the idea after Live Nation proved it’s loyalty to the consumer plan was a success. Why shouldn’t they sell their own tickets? The more they make, the more they can afford to continue to reduce prices and offer more value. They are known for sharing their wealth, so why waste it by paying someone to do a job for them that they can easily do themselves? What would you do? It’s good for everyone….except for that old dinosaur Ticketmaster. Out with the old already. L.N. is current and in touch with us…. the fans.

  • http://www.iamcorrect.com Lono

    Death to ticketmaster. That being said, I support any competition. For low price shows (anything under $30), Ticketmaster fees were getting 40% of face value. How could ANYONE support that for printing a tiny piece of paper.

    Oh wait, they don’t even have do to that anymore. Ticketmaster lets you print your own tickets now. This saves them the toner, ticketstock paper, and postage. YET… they charge you $2.50 for the priveledge.

  • http://www.iamcorrect.com Lono

    Death to ticketmaster. That being said, I support any competition. For low price shows (anything under $30), Ticketmaster fees were getting 40% of face value. How could ANYONE support that for printing a tiny piece of paper.

    Oh wait, they don’t even have do to that anymore. Ticketmaster lets you print your own tickets now. This saves them the toner, ticketstock paper, and postage. YET… they charge you $2.50 for the priveledge.

  • http://www.iamcorrect.com Lono

    Death to ticketmaster. That being said, I support any competition. For low price shows (anything under $30), Ticketmaster fees were getting 40% of face value. How could ANYONE support that for printing a tiny piece of paper.

    Oh wait, they don’t even have do to that anymore. Ticketmaster lets you print your own tickets now. This saves them the toner, ticketstock paper, and postage. YET… they charge you $2.50 for the priveledge.

  • http://www.ticketleap.com Online Ticketing

    Check out TicketLeap – it’s a reasonably priced alternative.

  • http://www.ticketleap.com Online Ticketing

    Check out TicketLeap – it’s a reasonably priced alternative.

  • http://www.ticketleap.com Online Ticketing

    Check out TicketLeap – it’s a reasonably priced alternative.

  • http://www.livemusicblog.com Justin

    Mark: I guess I’m not really sure that history would ever dictate what a corporation does in the future, most notably because a corporation doesn’t have a personality or identity that you can ever really count on. They might undercut Ticketmaster a little bit…or maybe they won’t call it a processing fee…but I have full confidence that the industry itself — concert tickets — is a monopolistic, control-hungry enterprise with long-term contracts and other bullshit that gets in the way of pure enterprise…

    What are we missing? What history textbooks shall we be reading?

    Here’s the thing — COKE or PEPSI? It might taste a little different but I’m guessing it’s still going to cost the same. And prices will never go down, especially once the entire industry focuses on pushing acts out on tours as a way to make money back off lost album sales.

    Lono made a perfect point — Ticketmaster is not innovating as a way to reduce price, they’re innovating as a way to charge a premium for a distribution channel that they control. Don’t like it? Just try to buy cheaper tickets from Live Nation…

    I dunno…I just don’t see it happening the way we want it to.

  • http://www.livemusicblog.com Justin

    Mark: I guess I’m not really sure that history would ever dictate what a corporation does in the future, most notably because a corporation doesn’t have a personality or identity that you can ever really count on. They might undercut Ticketmaster a little bit…or maybe they won’t call it a processing fee…but I have full confidence that the industry itself — concert tickets — is a monopolistic, control-hungry enterprise with long-term contracts and other bullshit that gets in the way of pure enterprise…

    What are we missing? What history textbooks shall we be reading?

    Here’s the thing — COKE or PEPSI? It might taste a little different but I’m guessing it’s still going to cost the same. And prices will never go down, especially once the entire industry focuses on pushing acts out on tours as a way to make money back off lost album sales.

    Lono made a perfect point — Ticketmaster is not innovating as a way to reduce price, they’re innovating as a way to charge a premium for a distribution channel that they control. Don’t like it? Just try to buy cheaper tickets from Live Nation…

    I dunno…I just don’t see it happening the way we want it to.

  • http://www.livemusicblog.com Justin

    Mark: I guess I’m not really sure that history would ever dictate what a corporation does in the future, most notably because a corporation doesn’t have a personality or identity that you can ever really count on. They might undercut Ticketmaster a little bit…or maybe they won’t call it a processing fee…but I have full confidence that the industry itself — concert tickets — is a monopolistic, control-hungry enterprise with long-term contracts and other bullshit that gets in the way of pure enterprise…

    What are we missing? What history textbooks shall we be reading?

    Here’s the thing — COKE or PEPSI? It might taste a little different but I’m guessing it’s still going to cost the same. And prices will never go down, especially once the entire industry focuses on pushing acts out on tours as a way to make money back off lost album sales.

    Lono made a perfect point — Ticketmaster is not innovating as a way to reduce price, they’re innovating as a way to charge a premium for a distribution channel that they control. Don’t like it? Just try to buy cheaper tickets from Live Nation…

    I dunno…I just don’t see it happening the way we want it to.

  • john wildrew

    How is LiveNation lowering prices by charging secondary pricing? The people who get the back end here is the fans, now they have no oppurtunity to get tickets. Over a year ago LiveNation said they wanted to split from ticketmaster because prices they were charging for tickets are too high, now they want to do dynamic prices to raise on the fans? are you LYV holders on crack?

  • john wildrew

    How is LiveNation lowering prices by charging secondary pricing? The people who get the back end here is the fans, now they have no oppurtunity to get tickets. Over a year ago LiveNation said they wanted to split from ticketmaster because prices they were charging for tickets are too high, now they want to do dynamic prices to raise on the fans? are you LYV holders on crack?

  • john wildrew

    How is LiveNation lowering prices by charging secondary pricing? The people who get the back end here is the fans, now they have no oppurtunity to get tickets. Over a year ago LiveNation said they wanted to split from ticketmaster because prices they were charging for tickets are too high, now they want to do dynamic prices to raise on the fans? are you LYV holders on crack?

  • Karen

    Just don’t buy concert tickets. Shut it all down for a year. When the artists see what is going on (with empty venues) they will be the ones to take charge

  • Karen

    Just don’t buy concert tickets. Shut it all down for a year. When the artists see what is going on (with empty venues) they will be the ones to take charge

  • Karen

    Just don’t buy concert tickets. Shut it all down for a year. When the artists see what is going on (with empty venues) they will be the ones to take charge